My Blog

Posts for: August, 2017

By Laura Elliff, DMD
August 24, 2017
Category: Oral Health
Tags: sensitive teeth  
The3TopCausesforToothSensitivity

Like other living tissue, your teeth can feel. Dentin, the layer below the enamel, houses fluid-filled conduits that transmit temperature or pressure sensations to a nerve network within the tooth’s inner pulp. It’s so effective that incoming sensations must be buffered — “toned down”— to avoid a painful overload of the nerves. The enamel above the gum line and a bone-like substance called cementum below help do this.

Unfortunately, if teeth lose this protection they can become hypersensitive. This can cause a flash of sharp pain while eating or drinking something cold or hot or just biting down.

There are a number of causes for tooth sensitivity, any of which can influence how we treat it. While you’ll need a dental exam to know for sure, your hypersensitivity will more than likely stem from one of these 3 problems.

Periodontal (gum) disease. This is an infection caused by bacterial plaque, a thin film of bacteria and food particles that accumulates on the teeth due to poor oral hygiene. The inflamed gum tissues weaken and detach from the teeth, causing them to shrink back or recede. This leaves the cementum unprotected, which easily erodes and exposes the dentin to acid and bacteria — and hypersensitivity. Clinically removing the plaque helps the affected gums heal. In extreme cases, the gums may need surgical grafting to regenerate.

Overaggressive brushing. While a lack of oral hygiene can contribute to gum recession, ironically too much hygiene — brushing too hard for too long — can damage your gums and cause them to recede. Brushing really doesn’t require a lot of elbow grease — a gentle scrubbing motion over all tooth surfaces is sufficient to remove plaque. Fine-tuning your brushing will help your gums to recover and heal.

Mouth acid. Although quite strong, enamel has one formidable enemy: acid, which can erode enamel and expose the dentin. Over-indulgence in acidic foods and beverages can make your mouth more acidic; more likely, though, bacterial plaque will again be the culprit, because bacteria excrete an acidic waste product. You can reduce mouth acid with daily brushing and flossing and consuming less acidic foods and beverages.

If you’re experiencing any kind of tooth pain, see us for an examination. We’ll determine the cause and initiate the appropriate treatment to regain your oral health.

If you would like more information on tooth sensitivity, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Treatment of Tooth Sensitivity: Understanding Your Options.”


DentalOfficesHoldtotheHighestStandardstoProtectPatientsfromInfection

Our bodies wage a continuous war against enemies too small to be seen with the naked eye. If we’re healthy, our immune system will stop the vast majority of these microbial agents.

But some of them, viruses in particular, are so small and with certain characteristics that they can slip past our immune systems. Prevention — removing the opportunity for these viruses to gain entry into our bodies in the first place — is a key component in controlling infection.

Healthcare facilities, including dental offices, are primary battlegrounds in this war. In recent years, the stakes have increased as viral infections that cause the liver disease hepatitis (B and C) and HIV that causes the auto-immune disorder AIDS are on the rise. Although different in effect, these viruses spread in much the same way — when the blood of an infected person comes in contact with the bloodstream of another person.

The risk for this exposure is higher in situations when there’s a break in the skin. Blood transfusion, surgery centers and similar facilities with invasive procedures require high standards of protection to prevent viral transmission between people.  This includes dental clinics — even a routine hygienic cleaning can become a conduit for viral infection.

As a result, the more than 170,000 dental providers across the country have adopted strict infection control standards that conform to the National Center for Disease Control (CDC) guidelines, as well as state and local regulations. These standards detail such issues as wearing protective equipment and clothing (like disposable gloves, gowns or facemasks), cleaning and sterilizing instruments, or disposing of bio-hazardous waste.

High infection control standards are also promoted by the professional boards and organizations of dental providers, like the American Dental Association, and are a requirement for continued membership. As a result, infection occurrences from dental visits or procedures are extremely rare.

We understand you may have concerns. We’re glad to discuss with you our procedures for infection control and how we’re following the highest standards to keep you and our staff safe. We’re making sure the care you receive for your teeth and gums doesn’t lead to another health problem.

If you would like more information on dental infection control practices, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Infection Control in the Dental Office.”


ASmileMakeoverDependsonBalancingTechniquewithBeauty

“Redesigning” a smile is a lot like remodeling a house: the technicalities of construction must blend seamlessly with what is perceived as elegant and beautiful. The first aspect — the proper materials and techniques to achieve a sound restoration — is absolutely crucial. But the aesthetic is just as important for assuring the final restoration evokes beauty and style.

Balancing these two aspects of a smile makeover requires thoughtful intent and planning. What may be pleasing aesthetically may not be technically feasible; but what may be technically sound may not have that sought-after “curb appeal.”

You and your dentist must work together to achieve the successful blending of these two aspects. That’s why it’s important for you to have full confidence in your dentist: that he or she is both technically skilled and experienced in cosmetic procedures and artistically aware of what will look best aesthetically.

The first step in your makeover is a thorough dental examination to determine the overall state of your oral health. With this “bigger picture,” your dentist will have a better understanding of what’s possible and practical for you and your situation. The exam may also reveal problems that should be treated first before any cosmetic work.

From there, you must communicate clearly to your dentist what you perceive as wrong with your smile and what you would like to have changed. While there are general principles of beauty best followed, your dental work could hypothetically take different paths depending on your desires and expectations. You might prefer a more “sexy” look or one that’s “sophisticated.” Or perhaps you only want subtle changes that still retain features expressing your individuality.

Ultimately, though, your expectations must line up with reality. Much like your house contractor, your dentist will advise you on what’s both practical and possible. And with their experience in smile enhancement, they can also help you determine what will look most attractive given your facial structure and features.

With this preliminary planning, you can be confident as the work proceeds that the end of the project will be both exciting and satisfying. And just as with your newly renovated home, you’ll be more than happy to share your smile with others.

If you would like more information on enhancing your smile through cosmetic dentistry, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Beautiful Smiles by Design.”