My Blog

Posts for: August, 2018

By Laura Elliff, DMD
August 21, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: crowns  
CrownsCouldbetheSmileSolutionforSomeUnattractiveTeeth

While dental implants have become the most popular restoration among both dentists and patients, it’s primarily a tooth replacement — either for a missing tooth or a tooth beyond repair that must be extracted. But what if your tooth is still viable beneath its unattractive exterior? From an oral health standpoint, it’s usually wise to preserve it.

Even so, you still have options for making a tooth that’s spoiling your smile more attractive. One of the most effective solutions happens to be one of the oldest in dentistry: a crown. In effect, a crown is a life-like replica made of metal or dental porcelain that’s bonded over a tooth. And with today’s advanced materials and methods a crown can not only enhance the appearance of the tooth it covers, it can also be made to blend with the color and symmetry of adjacent teeth.

Here are a few dental situations where a crown could provide both protection for a tooth and a more attractive appearance.

Chipped, Damaged or Abnormally Developed Teeth. Teeth often take the brunt of mouth injuries, resulting in chips or even fractures. Also, teeth sometimes don’t erupt fully or develop a normal shape. A crown can effectively cover these missing or abnormal parts of a tooth and restore a more natural appearance.

Following Root Canal Treatment. Trauma or deep decay can damage the interior of a tooth - the pulp and root canals - and endanger its survival. A root canal treatment cleans out and repairs these areas, filling them with a special filling to prevent further infection. A crown is usually necessary to both protect the tooth and restore its appearance.

Discoloration. There’s a difference between outward staining of the enamel, which can usually be brightened with whitening solutions, and staining deep within the tooth from various causes. While there are techniques to bleach “intrinsic” staining, a crown provides another option for covering a heavily discolored tooth for a more attractive appearance.

Excessive Wear. We all experience some teeth wearing as we age; but grinding or clenching habits can accelerate that wear and shorten teeth, resulting in a prematurely aged look. Crowns restore worn teeth to a more normal length that can take “years” off your smile.

If you would like more information on crown restorations, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Crowns & Bridgework.”


By Laura Elliff, DMD
August 11, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
WorldCupSoccerCoach-DentistSavestheDay

If you followed the 2018 FIFA World Cup Soccer games, you probably know that one of this year’s biggest surprises was the debut of the team from Iceland—the smallest country ever to earn a chance at the sport’s top prize. But here’s something you may not have known: When he’s not on the field, the team’s coach, Heimir Hallgrímsson, is a practicing dentist! Those two skill sets might not seem like a natural fit… but they came together dramatically at a recent contest.

At a local women’s game last summer, when a player was hit and her tooth was knocked out, Dr. Hallgrímsson took immediate action. “I jumped on the pitch and put the tooth back in, took her to a dental office and fixed it,” he said.

Not everyone has the special training or ability to fix a tooth that has been damaged or knocked out—but there are some simple things that you can do to help an adult who has suffered this kind of injury. Here’s a quick run-down:

  • After making sure the person is stable and not otherwise seriously injured, try to locate the tooth.
  • Handle it carefully, without touching root surfaces, and clean it gently with water if possible.
  • Try to open and gently rinse out the mouth, and find where the tooth came from.
  • Carefully place the tooth back in its socket, making sure it is facing the right way, and hold it in place with a soft cloth.
  • If the tooth can’t be re-implanted, place it in a bag with a special preservative solution, milk or saliva, or have the person hold it between the cheek and gum—but make sure it isn’t swallowed!
  • Rush to the nearest dental office or urgent care facility.

When these steps are followed and the person receives professional treatment as quickly as possible (ideally within minutes), their tooth will have the best chance of being saved. But even if it isn’t possible to preserve the tooth, receiving prompt and appropriate care can make replacing the tooth much easier.

Having Dr. Hallgrímsson on the sidelines was a lucky break for the injured soccer player—and as a coach, just getting to the World Cup is a remarkable achievement. But you don’t need to be a coach (or a dentist) to give first aid in a dental emergency. Taking the right steps can help ensure the best possible outcome… and might even save a tooth!

If you would like more information about emergency dental treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor articles “Knocked Out Tooth” and “The Field-Side Guide to Dental Injuries.”


By Laura Elliff, DMD
August 01, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene   oral health  
CananAppHelpYouBrushYourTeeth

If you’re the kind of person who can’t do without a smart phone, you’ve probably heard the expression “There’s an app for that!” These nifty little programs let you get directions, check the weather, watch stock prices… even optimize your sleep patterns and make high-pitched dog whistles. And shortly, you’ll be able to check how well you’ve been brushing your teeth.

News reports have mentioned a soon-to-be-available toothbrush that will interface with an app on your smart phone. The brush has sensors that record how much time you spend brushing, whether you reach all parts of your mouth, and whether you brush correctly (with up and down motions, not just side to side). It charts your oral hygiene habits, scores your brushing technique — and, if you allow it, shares information about how well (or poorly) you’re doing with your family, friends… even your dentist.

So do you need to run out and buy one of these gizmos as soon as they’re available? Of course not! However, anything that encourages you to take better care of your oral hygiene can’t hurt. A wise dentist once said: The important thing is not the brush, but the hand that holds it.

If you’re a “gadget person,” you may be intrigued by the device’s high-tech design, and the fact that it interfaces with your phone. Plus, maybe the idea of compiling (and sharing) your brushing record has a certain appeal. On the other hand, you might prefer a sleek, light electric brush that doesn’t keep track of your movements. Or maybe the simplest brush of all — a manual one, with soft bristles and a comfortable handle — works best for you.

The most important thing is that you regularly practice good oral hygiene: Brush twice a day, for two minutes each time, and floss once a day. Use whichever brush is best for you, and be sure to change it every three months, or when the bristles get stiff. Stay away from sugary snacks between meals (they contribute to decay by keeping your teeth bathed in acidic byproducts). Don’t use tobacco in any form, or chew on things that don’t belong in your mouth. And remember to come in for regular exams and professional cleanings. If an app helps you do these things — we're all for it.

If you would like to learn more about maintaining good oral hygiene, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. For more information, see the Dear Doctor magazine article “Top 10 Oral Health Tips For Children.”